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10/17/2013

A Student's Perspective: Visiting the Beijing School for the Blind

If you have been following any of the CIEE Beijing program blogs, you may have read our post about visiting the Beijing School for the Blind.

Though students did not have an opportunity to volunteer during the summer term, CIEE Beijing was able to arrange a half-day excursion to the Beijing School for the Blind.

Instead of writing any more, we would like to hand over this blog to Zachary Folk. A rising junior at the University of Missouri - Columbia, here's what this special activity meant to him.

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The blind school was huge, and had plenty of resources for the students there.  We first observed an English class.  The students there were bright individuals who looked like they were having a lot of fun with the class.  Since a bunch of foreign students were visiting their class, the teacher created a quiz game about America for the students.  During this game, we got to see the students answer questions about what is considered American food, such as pizza, chicken wings, hamburgers, and some questions about the largest American holiday, Christmas.

After the quiz on America, they asked us questions about America in English and we asked them questions about China in Chinese.  After that, we all split up to talk a little bit 1 on 1 with the students. I talked to this one student and asked him questions with the limited amount of Chinese that I knew, and he answered back in the English he knew.  He was a typical boy who was very interested in America. My friend Robby asked him if he had a girlfriend at all, and he said he didn’t have time for a girlfriend and would rather study, which I found pretty funny. His ability to study English so well, even with his disability, was astounding to me.

DSC08750

The school's director explains how they teach students to cook for themselves.

During the tour, we met a little boy who was playing a Suona (a copper or brass-bodied reed instrument). He played with more skill than I could play my saxophone when I was in my high school’s jazz band, and he couldn’t be any older than 7 years old.  He told us that he had been playing for only a year, which is even crazier considering how great he was. I could listen to him play all day, but we had to continue the rest of the tour.  We saw many more rooms that helped the kids learn and adapt to their disability, such as a music therapy room and eye exam room, and we ultimately arrived in their library, which I found to be the highlight of the tour.  In the library, students could use special computers that translated webpages into Chinese Braille so the students could read them.  It also had plenty of books in Chinese Braille that students could read, learn, and enjoy.

DSC08785

This special surface translates what is on the screen into readable Chinese Braille.

I had also noticed that during the tour there were bumps on the floor that students could use so they could get around easier.  I also noticed that most sidewalks in Beijing had these same bumps throughout the city, as well as many other amenities that could assist the blind in living normal lives. With the help of the blind school, it doesn’t surprise me that it is easy for people with blindness to live normal lives.  From our tour of the facility, we learned that many people do graduate and grow up to live normal and successful lives. This school has become a model for blind schools around the world. It is great to see that Beijing has put so much effort in assisting the blind, and I hope other cities around the world adopt this same policy. I wish I had more time during my short visit to Beijing to return to the school to possibly volunteer or see more what the school is like and how the students learn to live with their disability.

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During the spring and fall semesters, the school seeks CIEE students to volunteer as English teachers for the entire semester. Students participating in any CIEE Beijing programs who are willing to make a semester-long commitment are welcome to volunteer and give back to the Beijing community.

Comments

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Sub:- We are interested to China Country by our own cost for the purpose of Education and Rehabilitation for the Blind, Physically Handicapped and other Disabled people.

Dear Sir/Madam,
With the honor to state that, Louis Braille Memorial Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped is working for Child, Youth and Adult Blind, Deaf Blind, Deaf, Partially Sighted, Visually Impaired, Physically Handicapped and other Disabled people in Bangladesh and our services are free for all and we provide educational facility to our member and other peoples in Bangladesh.

We are interested to visit your country’s blind, physically handicapped and other Disabled School, Vocational Training Center as we want to learn the method of your training and teaching so that we can apply it in our country.

We are ready to pay all kinds of expense of our program such as food, transportation, accommodation etc.

In this regard, our request to you that please arrange our visit in your country’s Blind, Physically Handicapped and other Disabled school and vocational training center in your country.

We are also requested to you, If you are not in a position to arrange this program, we would be grateful if you could recommend other Organization as they may be interested in our proposal.

We shall look forward for your kind response.

Mahfuz Milon Prodhan
Secretary
LOUIS BRAILLE MEMORIAL LIBRARY
FOR THE BLIND AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED

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